Eight Days of Diapers – Part II: Traditions

This story is written by WingZ

Andy stood over the kitchen garbage can, a big potato in one hand and a peeler in the other. It was Friday, late afternoon, and he was helping his mother make latkes. The crunchy potato pancakes were one of Andy’s favorite foods and helping his mother make them had become something of a tradition in years’ past. Still, he contemplated sitting this year out. Jake was old enough to finally be useful in the kitchen and Andy felt it was time to pass the torch. But when he found Jake dawdling instead of peeling, asking dumb questions like “how come Grandma’s have carrots in them and yours don’t?,” Andy took the peeler from his brother’s idle hands and went to work. His mother wouldn’t say it, but he was sure she was grateful.

It was already dark when the Greenbaums sat down to eat. They enjoyed a modest meal, nothing like the family feast which awaited them on Saturday. When they were finished and the plates were cleared, Andy and Jake left the kitchen for the dining room, where a brass menorah waited on a plate covered with tinfoil to catch the dripping wax. Eight candleholders stood in a row before a raised Star of David while the ninth candleholder formed a row of one in front. Andy’s mother had already put the first night’s candle, a red one, in the far right candleholder. Another, white candle, the eventual shamas (or helper), lay flat on the silver foil.

“Hanukah!” Jake yelped excitedly. Andy, only slightly more composed himself, didn’t have the heart to tell him to calm down.

“Don’t forget your kippas, boys,” their father reminded him, his head already covered. Andy kept one beside his prayer book for Hebrew school and went to fetch it. When he returned, he found his brother wearing a brightly colored winter sock hat with a pompom at the end.

“You look stupid,” Andy told him.

“Nuh-uh,” Jake protested.

“Dad, make him take it off.”

“I think he’s OK wearing it tonight,” their father said. “But not tomorrow.”

“Definitely not,” their mother seconded.

With no further adieu, the family gathered around the menorah. Andy’s father struck a match, lit the shamas and passed it off to Andy, who was surprised to take the burning candle in his hand.

“Time to put your Hebrew to good use,” his father said.

Andy nodded, and, after a moment’s hesitation, began to read prayers from the candle box while setting the red candle ablaze. They were transliterated, but he focused on the Hebrew characters above the English text. He knew he needed to take this ancient, tricky language and make it his own if he stood any chance of getting through his Bar Mitzvah. The Hanukah prayers would be good practice. His voice wrestled with the syllables, but in the end, he nailed it, even the extra prayer for the holiday’s first night.

“Very nice, Andy,” his mother said as she took the dripping shamas and placed it in the holder.

Everyone scattered after that, each to retrieve a card or a gift. Andy had gotten his parents a picture frame and a small card to go with it. He wrapped it himself and kept it stowed in his closet for two weeks. It wasn’t much, but it was the best that he, 12 years old and devoid of income, could do. For Jake, he got gelt. The chocolate coins were likewise a cheapie gift, but he knew they would satisfy Jake just fine. His brother loved candy and it showed.

Moments later, with the candles burning a room away, the family regrouped in the living room to exchange gifts. Andy spotted two large packages, wrapped in white and blue paper. He had not forgotten about the diapers, obviously, but now he began to wonder if that would be it. Would they give them to him right here and right now, in front of Jake, or would he receive them later? Would they come in lieu of another gift or would they be a supplement?

Andy swallowed hard and forced his attention back to the ritual at hand. He and Jake both presented to their parents first. His picture frame elicited another “Very nice, Andy” from his mother and a “Thank you, son” from his father, while they both oohed and ahhed over Jake’s crappy arts-and-crafts collage as only parents knew how. Andy might have been mad about that, but what happened next erased all his animosity. He and Jake turned toward one another and simultaneously presented each other with identical bags of gelt! The entire family burst out laughing and it took them all a good moment or two to recover.

“This one is for the both of you,” their mother said, pushing one of the packages between them. Jake tore at the wrapping paper with savage abandon, revealing a brand-new Nintendo Wii.

“Wii!” he shouted. “Awesome!”

Andy felt himself grow excited too. Maybe it wouldn’t be so bad sharing with Jake. If anything, he knew he would no longer be the worst player.

“I don’t want you to spend all day in front of this thing,” their father said. “The first sign of your grades going down, it’s going right in the closet. Understood?”

They nodded in unison and their mother handed them each an envelope. Inside was a card and a Toys R Us gift certificate.

“Thanks, Mom. Thanks, Dad,” Andy said.

“Thanks, Mom. Thanks, Dad,” Jake parroted.

“Jake’s is a bit more,” their mother explained. “Because Andy is getting this.”

She handed him the last remaining package and he took it with sweaty palms and baited breath. He knew what was inside, but he was still reluctant to open it. What if his father was right? What if it really WASN’T all it cracked up to be? Diapers were a dream for him, a fairy tale, and he was old enough to know those never came true. Still, he had to find out for himself. It was destiny, he thought, as he peeled off the paper.

Inside, Andy found a 20-count pack of Depend fitted briefs, a tub of wipes and a container of Johnson & Johnson baby powder. He ran his hand over the green bag of diapers, the plastic sending a small jolt to his fingertips. They were real, they were here and they were his. He was so happy he could cry.

Jake, on the other hand, was laughing. “Andy got diapers, Andy got diapers,” he taunted. It took some of the wind out of Andy’s sails, but it was to be expected.

“Jake, this is what your brother wanted,” their mother calmly explained. “He’s going through a…phase right now and there is no reason to be mean to him about it.”

“But…”

“It wasn’t all that long ago that you were in diapers, mister,” she said. That shut him up. Jake had been a late trainer. He was three when he stopped having daytime accidents and he continued to wet at night for a few months thereafter.

“Satisfied?” their father asked.

“Mmm-hmm,” Andy said.

“Well,” his father said, clearing his throat. “As long as you’re happy.”

It was clear his father wasn’t entirely comfortable with the whole arrangement, but that made Andy love him even more. He knew that meant he cared.

“Dad, can you set this up?” Jake asked, pointing to the Wii. “I wanna play.”

“In a minute.”

Andy wanted to set the Wii up himself, to show that, despite the diapers, he was still capable of doing plenty. His mother, however, had other ideas.

“While they’re doing that, Andy, why don’t you come with me?” she said. She’d gathered up the bag of diapers and motioned for Andy to grab the rest of the supplies. Together, they retreated to the privacy of his room.

“How you choose to use these – if you choose to use these – is up to you,” she told him. “I only ask that you be sanitary. Wrap them up in a plastic bag when you change and for God’s sake, change regularly.”

“Yes, Mom,” Andy said. He felt like he was being talked down to. Was that part of it too?

“Now,” she said. “It’s been awhile, but I should still remember how to do this…”

“Mom?” Andy asked, confused. “Are you going to put a diaper on me?”

“Just this first one,” she said. “Just so you can see how it’s done. After that, it’s your responsibility.”

Andy nodded. So he wasn’t getting changed, after all. It wasn’t quite what he wanted, but, he reasoned, it was certainly good enough. Come to think of it, it was probably better this way. It was less for him to feel weird or guilty about.

Following his mother’s instructions, Andy disrobed and lay back on his bed. His mother unfolded the first of the briefs and slid it under him, the top even with his lower back. “Hmm…these are a little big on you,” she observed. “That means they’ll rise a little higher. Be careful not to let them ride too high in the back though.”

“I won’t,” he answered. Andy took in the rest of his mother’s advice while she powdered him. He was told to keep the tapes even and aim for a tight fit, but not TOO tight or the tapes would pop. She also told him to make sure the brief was fully unfolded, to avoid bunching.

“There,” she said, after pressing down the last of the tapes. “How’s that?”

“It feels good,” Andy answered. It did, too. Having a diaper around his waist seemed to suck all the tension right out of him. That he was Jewish, that he couldn’t throw a football to save his life, that he had a kid’s bike and unstylish clothes – none of it seemed to matter now. He had his diaper and he felt safe and secure, so much so that he began to wiggle around on his bed, oblivious to how dumb or strange he must look.

“You know,” his mother said, smiling down at him. “Maybe you’re onto something.”

She didn’t clarify the comment and he didn’t ask her to. He thanked her for the tips, pulled his pants back up and rejoined the rest of his family in front of the television. His dad had the Wii set up and Jake was busy crafting his Mii, a digital avatar, which, of course, looked nothing like him.

A few minutes later, Andy had his Mii ready to go as well and he and Jake took turns battling each other at Wii Sports, the system’s pack-in title. Maybe it was the diaper or maybe it was the lack of more experienced gamers to scrutinize him, but, for whatever reason, Andy found he was doing a lot better with the troublesome controller. He took three strokes to win his first round of golf, while it took Jake close to 10. Which, Andy had to admit, was about par for a 7-year-old.

“I don’t wanna play golf anymore,” Jake protested.

“You’re only saying that because you got your butt kicked,” Andy pointed out.

“Yeah, well you’re wearing a diaper!”

Andy jabbed him lightly in the arm, but agreed to switch sports nevertheless. It didn’t matter. He felt like he could do anything and be happy. It was as good as he felt in a long time and he wished that feeling could last forever. But on some level, he knew it would not. He had another seven nights to contend with and the next one would be spent with additional family.

This story is written by WingZ

You can find more story’s like this one posted on My ABDL Life. The only thing you need to do is to check out this page to find them.

Eight Days of Diapers – Part I: A Hanukah Wish

This story is written by WingZ

“So do you get presents every night?” That, along with “is there a Hanukah Bush?” was the extent of Andy’s friends’ interest in Hanukah, in the entirety of his faith, actually. And though Andy felt confident enough to answer – gifts were usually exchanged during the first two nights and there was no bush, just a menorah – there was plenty about his religion that mystified him. There was the Hebrew language with its harsh, guttural sounds and funky alphabet; the holidays whose names he mixed up and whose meanings were reduced to dietary prescriptions (dairy on Shavuot, hamantashen on Purim, nothing at all on Yom Kippur); the dozens of other things, large and small, which separated him from his friends, who were Episcopalian or Catholic and claimed Sunday as their day of worship and had no need for any tongue but plain old English. Andy was 12 now, his Bar Mitzvah less than a year away, and he could feel those differences creeping up on him, threatening to sever his tenuous grip on “normal.”

Deep down, however, he knew it was not his religion which risked turning him into a pariah, that he would feel the same anxiety if his last name were Smith instead of Greenbaum. It had to do with what he liked, which, he guessed, had to do with who he was. Take his bike, for instance. He had it since he was 7 and though he’d had to have the seat raised a few times, he liked it just fine when he was riding alone. It was familiar, comfortable, and reliable. When he rode with friends, however, it embarrassed him. It was clearly a kid’s bike, a blue single-speed Schwinn which once housed training wheels. His friends were all moving onto the mountain bikes and street cruisers which would carry them into their teens and Andy knew it would only be a matter of time before they grew tired of waiting for him to catch up.

It was the same thing with video games. Andy’s friends favored the Nintendo Wii and Andy thought it looked like fun…until he tried to play it. He was unable to master the Wii Remote’s motion sensitivity and his performance at Wii Sports was embarrassingly awful. In bowling, his balls spun right and struck gutter and in golf, he couldn’t stay out of the sand. “You just need more practice,” his friends told him. They encouraged him to ask his parents for a Wii of his own and Andy agreed, though privately he preferred the older, simpler gaming systems and did not look forward to sharing a Wii with his younger brother, Jake. So to fit in, Andy put down a new bike and a Wii on his Hanukah wish list, confident he could get one but not both, even though he really wanted neither.

What he really wanted was diapers. For the past few years, Andy longed to be put back in diapers, to be routinely checked and changed, to have no more concern for making it to the toilet than he did for having a job. The why of it eluded him. He did not struggle with continence growing up and he was not raised without love. All he knew was that no 12-year-old should want to wear diapers. If his Judaism made him different, that made him a full-blown freak. It shamed him deeply and he carried the weight of that shame alone.

But the shame did not deter him. Furtively, he browsed diaper sites on the computer he and Jake shared. He was desperate to find out more about his peculiar desire, to see if there were others like him. What he discovered blew his mind. There were pictures, stories, entire online communities dedicated to people who liked to wear diapers. It left Andy wondering how many “DLs” (diaper lovers) there were in the world. Hundreds? Thousands?

Visiting those sites had a strange effect on Andy. Initially, it made him feel even more ashamed. He knew some of the sites were meant for adults and he had no business looking at them. His face flushed with shame and some of the content he came across scared and confused him. At the same time, doing something he knew he shouldn’t be doing made him feel good. It was his own quiet way of standing up for himself and what he wanted.

On the teen forums, Andy found acceptance and a wealth of practical advice. He exaggerated slightly, claiming he was 14 instead of 12, but no one suspected otherwise. When he contemplated coming out to his parents about wanting diapers, a menagerie of posters advised against it. Some shared horror tales of awkwardness and familial dissension that lingered for weeks. Similarly, he learned that intentionally having “accidents” was foolhardy and that real diapers would be worth waiting years for.

Andy was always careful. He typed out everything he wanted to post in a Word document beforehand. That way, his progress would not be lost if he had to relinquish the computer to Jake or was called away unexpectedly. He cleared his browsing history regularly and never left browser windows open, not even when he stepped away to pee. It wasn’t foolproof, but Andy figured he could go on for quite awhile without getting caught. Jake was 7 and only cared about games, their mother didn’t know much more than word processing and their father always gave a heads up when he commandeered the computer to perform maintenance or install something.

The computer and the world of virtual diaperdom wasn’t as good as the real thing, but it was close as Andy thought he could get for now. In another few years, when he had a car and some money saved up and a lot more nerve, he would buy his own diapers and hide them and enjoy them when no one was around. In the meantime, however, he began clearing imaginary space in the garage or in front of the TV for the bike or the Wii and practiced his gracious smile for when he would undoubtedly receive them.

***

Hanukah started on a Friday that year. It would be over days before Christmas began, meaning Andy would not have off from school. Jake insisted this was a rip-off, but Andy knew better. All the important stuff happened at night anyway.

That Wednesday, Andy came home from school to find his father’s car in the driveway. This was not unusual – his father was a dentist and when his patients cancelled or no-showed their appointments, he headed home. Sure enough, he found his father seated at the kitchen table. His mother was there, too, and they both looked as if they’d been waiting for his arrival. They said they wanted to talk.

It could have been anything. It could have been more Bar Mitzvah planning or something about his brother, since they weren’t waiting until Jake got home in order to talk to him. Yet Andy couldn’t shake the feeling that his secret had been discovered. He felt his heart beat fast and hard in his chest and it took every ounce of self-control he could muster to not break down right there.

“What about?” he asked. He dropped his backpack by the door and pulled up a high-backed wooden chair.

“I needed to print up a list of odds and ends and last minute gifts,” his mother explained. “When I opened Word, what do you think I found?”

Andy felt like punching himself. He’d been in a hurry that morning and ended up hitting the off button on the computer instead of shutting it down like he was supposed to. That meant the next person to open Word would see a recovered document, his document. Normally, that next person was Andy himself – the middle school let out earlier than the elementary school and he always beat Jake home – but today it was his mother.

Of all the days to get caught, this was the worst. The post he’d started on that morning was in response to a Christmas wish list thread. Needless to say, he amended it to Hanukah. And needless to say, he put down diapers.

“I’m sorry,” he mumbled, staring down at the floor. His eyes focused on the gray swirls frozen in the white tile. The floor looked hard enough to crack a skull, but at that moment, he thought it would be softer than either of his parents’ faces.

“How long have you wanted this?” his mother asked. Slowly, Andy lifted his head. He was surprised to discover that his parents weren’t angry. They were concerned and a little bewildered, but not mad.

“A long time,” Andy replied. “I don’t know why. I kinda wish that I didn’t, but I do.”

His mother and father exchanged long glances, their eyes blank slates for Andy to project his anxiety. What if they try to have me sent away?, he thought. What if…

“Your mother and I talked this over,” his father said. “And I also discussed it with a doctor in my building, someone who works with children. We feel…” He paused, looking to his wife for confirmation, and Andy’s mother nodded with her lips pressed tightly together. “…that if this is something you want, something you really want, that we should let you have it.”

Andy couldn’t believe what he was hearing. His mouth fell open to issue a response, but it was as if he temporarily forgot how to speak. He managed to blurt out an “I” and let shocked silence fill its wake.

“It’s OK,” his mother told him, smiling now while she patted his back. He looked at her, at both of them, and wanted a “why,” only he didn’t, not if it cost him or complicated this most unexpected of victories. “We still love you.”

Andy relaxed slightly after that. The pressure was gone, but a lot of uncertainty remained. They said they would give him what he wanted, but for how long? Was there a catch? There had to be.

“What, exactly, am I getting?” he asked.

“Diapers for Hanukah,” his mother told him. “And you’ll be wearing them all eight days or until the package runs out. That ought to get this out of your system.”

Andy picked up on her subtle disapproval, but he didn’t care. He felt like he’d struck jackpot.

“Before you get too excited, you’d better be sure this is what you want,” his father cautioned. “It may not be all it’s cracked up to be.”

He knew what they were doing. For his parents, the diapers were a lesson. They probably figured he would get sick of them after a day or two and would want nothing more to do with them once the eight days were up. But Andy knew differently. This was a golden opportunity and he’d be an idiot not to take it.

“Yes, I want it,” he told them, practically giddy with excitement. “I want it a lot.”

This story is written by WingZ

You can find more story’s like this one posted on My ABDL Life. The only thing you need to do is to check out this page to find them.

Bought more console games

After that i come home and bought the Need For Speed game that i mention in a early post. I decide that i should bought some more console games but to Wii. This time i decided to bought the Pokemon Pokepark games: PokéPark: Pikachu‘s Adventure and PokéPark 2: Wonders Beyond. The first one i bought from a Swedish store whit name spelbutiken.se the second game bought I from an auction site. The bought console games had nice and good price. I think i going to get the games on monday if i have the luck on my side.

Soma lincub and…. beto gaming time

soma lincub and.... beto gaming time
soma lincub and…. beto gaming time

This is betowolf ‘s idea, so him me and lincub playing together, it takes a lot of concentrations, but looks like someone failed his training and will not have a little star on the calendar. . . : P Well its not like I care…

Source: http://www.furaffinity.net/view/7033957/

Cute drawing. Little bad the you dont can see the  calendar in the drawing so you could see how many stars he have. But every won can forgot about the potty when you have a good time playing whit friends. Good thing his still had his diaper on. So it not result to a wet spot on the floor. Thats more bad.